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At its foundation, conflict engagement is a relational endeavor that requires personal growth integrated with acquisition of professional skills. In this way, it is congruent with the process of becoming an effective clinician.
— EHCCO- Conflict Engagement Training for Health Professionals, White Paper, 2009
Conflict Engagement Training for Health Professionals

Conflict Engagement Training for Health Professionals

A Strategic Approach for Managing Conflict- Part 1

A Strategic Approach for Managing Conflict- Part 1

The hospital manages conflict between leadership groups to protect the quality and safety of care.
— The Joint Commission Accreditation Manual, Leadership Standard, LD 02.04.01
A Strategic Approach for Managing Conflict- Part 2

A Strategic Approach for Managing Conflict- Part 2

The goal of this standard is not to resolve conflict, but rather to create the expectation that hospitals will develop and implement a conflict management process so that conflict does not adversely affect patient safety or quality of care.
— The Joint Commission, Comprehensive Accreditation Manual for Hospitals
Using Mediation Techniques to Manage Conflict

Using Mediation Techniques to Manage Conflict

Integrating the techniques used by mediators of listening for understanding,
reframing, elevating the definition of the
problem, and creating clear agreements can foster collaboration. Better work relationships can improve patient outcomes, improve retention and recruitment of staff, and improve patient satisfaction.
— Debra Gerardi, Using Mediation Techniques to Manage Conflict and Create Healthy Work Environments, AACN Clinical Issues, 2004
Emerging Culture of Healthcare: Improving End-of-life care through collaboration and conflict engagement

Emerging Culture of Healthcare: Improving End-of-life care through collaboration and conflict engagement

"There are frequent calls for improving end-of-life care in the United States. In a recent Hastings Center special report, Murray and Jennings cite three areas that require rethinking of current assumptions regarding end-of-life care. These include greater attention to (1) the end-of-life care delivery system, (2) the approach to advance directives and surrogate decisionmaking, and (3) how we manage conflict and disagreement.

Conflict is common during end-of-life decisionmaking. In a 2001 study, conflict was identified by at least one member of the clinical team in 78% of 102 cases of intensive care unit patients who were determined to have a likelihood of having treatment withheld or withdrawn.  Conflict surrounding end-of-life care typically takes three forms: conflict among the patient's family members, between the family and the health care providers, and conflict that arises among the team members themselves."